BLM and Jew Hatred: Ben Ndugga-Kabuye Defends His Statement

There is a disturbing intersection between the Black Lives Matter organization and Jew hatred. Militant black groups such as the Nation of Islam and the Black Panthers historically supported the Arab cause against Israel in the 1960s and ’70s, seeing in “Palestinians” an analogy to their own struggles. BLM has taken up an even more virulently anti-Israel and anti-Jewish position, supporting the BDS campaign and accusing Israel of “apartheid” and “genocide”.

As Pamela Geller, David Horowitz, and others have repeated noted, Jew hatred and America hatred tend to go together, which makes radical Islam and Black Lives Matter not-so-strange bedfellows. Note in the article below the details of how the Council for American and Islamic Relations (CAIR) and BLM have specifically taken up each other’s causes.

 

Black Lives Matter author defends platform accusing Israel of ‘genocide’

by Pamela Geller [Atlas Shrugs]  *  13 August, 2016

It is no surprise that Black Lives Matter terrorists would be Jew-haters. American terror-tied groups like Hamas-CAIR support and agitate for the Black Lives Matter movement. A Black Lives Matter activist distributed flyers on “proper riot gear” in both English and Arabic (but not Spanish, French, Russian, etc).

It’s ironic, of course, because blacks (abeed in Arabic, meaning slave) are held as slaves in Muslim countries (i.e. 20% of the population of Mauritania are blacks enslaved by Muslims under.)

Muslim Congressman (and former cop) Andre Carson comments on recent police shootings: “These Shooters Aren’t My Brothers In Blue, They’re Murderers.”

Rep. Andre Carson, a former law enforcement officer, joined other members of the Congressional Black Caucus to condemn the recent police shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile.

Read through these series of links.

“Dallas massacre of police: FBI investigating anti-police group that attended Dallas mosque,” Robert Spencer, Jihad Watch, July 8, 2016:

The Hamas-linked Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) and other Islamic supremacist groups have assiduously courted Black Lives Matter, and linked their propaganda efforts against “Islamophobia” to the Black Lives Matter stand against perceived racism. In Dallas last night, we see where this is tending: as Kyle Shideler notes in the March article below, “At the event, MAS leader Khalilah Sabra openly discussed the importance of Muslim support for Black Lives Matter, and urged ‘revolution.’ Comparing the situation in the United States to the Muslim Brotherhood-led Arab Spring revolutions, she asked, ‘We are the community that staged a revolution across the world; if we can do that, why can’t we have that revolution in America?’” And with the mass murder of police in Dallas last night, we’re getting there.

The Nation of Islam is not an orthodox Muslim group, and subscribes to a great deal of racial mythology that is nowhere in Islamic tradition. It is, however, also true that many black Americans first enter the Nation, and then become orthodox Sunni Muslims. And given the increased racial tensions of the Obama era, many people in both the NOI and among mainstream Sunnis have a taste for the “revolution” that is brought about by means of jihad.

black-lives-matter

“Black Lives Matter author defends platform accusing Israel of ‘genocide,’” Jerusalem Post, August 9, 2016:

NEW YORK — The co-author of the Black Lives Matter platform passage accusing Israel of “genocide” defended the term, saying Israel’s actions fit in its wider definition.

Ben Ndugga-Kabuye co-authored the statement along with Rachel Gilmer, the former board member of a Zionist youth group. Ndugga-Kabuye told JTA he understood why Jewish groups disagree with the statement, but was perplexed that it has received so much attention.

He compared it with the accusations of genocide that black activists have leveled at the United States and called the Israeli-Palestinian conflict one of many international conflicts US black activists feel connected to.

“The way we look at it is, we take strong stances,” Ndugga-Kabuye, a New York City organizer for the Black Alliance for Just Immigration, told JTA. “The demand we’re making is we’re against the US continuing funding and military aid to the government of Israel. These are all things that are going to be in debate.”

The platform, released Aug. 2 by The Movement for Black Lives coalition, is largely a statement of the goals of a movement that coalesced around police violence directed against black people in the United States, mass incarceration of African-Americans and other domestic issues.

But it also calls for ending US military aid to Israel and accuses Israel of being an apartheid state. The platform includes a link to a website promoting the movement to boycott, divest and sanction Israel called BDS.

“The US justifies and advances the global war on terror via its alliance with Israel and is complicit in the genocide taking place against the Palestinian people” reads the “Invest/Divest” section of “A Vision for Black Lives.”

A string of Jewish organizations, from the Anti-Defamation League to the Reform movement and National Council of Jewish Women, has condemned the genocide and apartheid language as well as the BDS endorsement. T’ruah, a rabbis’ human rights group that opposes Israel’s West Bank occupation, also criticized the document.

Most of the organizations took pains to note that they are sympathetic to other parts of the platform, many of which jibe with liberal Jewish positions on the criminal justice system, economic justice and immigration.

“While we are deeply concerned about the ongoing violence and the human rights violations directed at both Israelis and Palestinians, we believe the terms genocide and apartheid are inaccurate and inappropriate to describe the situation,” NCJW wrote in a statement. “Further, BDS is too often used to de-legitimize Israel’s right to exist.”

Jewish Voice for Peace, which supports BDS, was the rare Jewish group that endorsed the platform in its entirety.

Ndugga-Kabuye said state actions don’t need to rise to the level of the Holocaust or other historical genocides to deserve the term, which he said could connote unjust state killing of a disadvantaged group. He compared his usage of the word to We Charge Genocide, a group that opposes police violence in Chicago.

“We’re talking about a structure of violent deaths that are state sanctioned, that are without accountability, and that are ongoing,” he told JTA. “We can say this is what’s happening in Palestine and not equate it with what’s happening in South America. It doesn’t say it’s the same number of people being killed or the [same] manner of people being killed.”

Ndugga-Kabuye said the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is just one of many international issues the platform comments on — including the dangers African migrants face in crossing the Mediterranean Sea, or conflicts in Somalia, Colombia or Honduras. He said the passage on Israel is longer because “there’s a certain prominence to it, and that may require us to go a little more in detail.” But he said the statements about other conflicts, charging the United States with imperialist actions, are just as strong as the language condemning Israel…

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